Cleantech Cluster Opportunities in Eastern Germany – Innovative Water Technologies for Smart Cities

Cleantech Event 2018

GTAI Investment Promotion Event – Cleantech Cluster Opportunities in Eastern Germany

Germany Trade & Invest and its partners cordially invite the German Canadian Business Association, as well as members of the public, to a breakfast seminar on “Cleantech Cluster Opportunities in Eastern Germany – Innovative Water Technologies for Smart Cities”. The seminar will take place on Wednesday, June 27, from 09:30 am – 12:30 pm at the Waterview.

Experts from Canada and Germany will share their knowledge and expertise about the region’s thriving Cleantech sector underlining its international significance. If you want to learn more about how Canadian companies can profit from Europe’s strongest economy, don’t miss out. Please note that this is an industry event.

Begin: 09:00 AM
06/27/2018
End:12:30 PM
Location:Waterview, 1661 Granville St, 2nd floor, Vancouver, BC V6Z 1N3

Programm DetailsPlease join us to find out more about business opportunities in Germany’s – and particularly Eastern Germany’s – thriving water technologies and cleantech industry. A comprehensive market overview will be complemented by insights into a Canadian company’s experience of investing in Germany. Moreover, this event will facilitate a knowledge exchange between experts from Canada and Germany.

Pioneering environmental policy and a supportive legal framework have helped establish Germany as one of the leading markets for sustainable water technologies. With a world market share of 11 percent and an expected annual growth of almost 12 percent until 2025, Germany offers attractive opportunities for innovative water technologies

Learn more at this link:  CleantechClusterOpportunities.html

Here are my selections: (photos below)

  1. Vancouver Alpen Club – 4875 Victoria Drive (all games) – Original German Haus
  2. Manchester Pub – 1941 W Broadway (all games) – The Official German House
  3. Blenheim Pub – 3293 West 4th Avenue (Saturday, June 23, 2018) (Brand new location)
  4. The Pint Vancouver – 455 Abbott Street (mainly Germany, Brazil & Mexico) – has two floors
  5. Red Card Sports Bar – 560 Smithe Street (all games) – German Language Meetup Group uses this venue

Germany in the FIFA World Cup

Group F with Mexico, Sweden and South Korea

Matchday 1 – Sunday, June 17, 2018 8 am – Mexico

Matchday 2 – Saturday, June 23, 2018 11 am – Sweden

Matchday 3 – Wednesday, June 27, 2018 7 am – South Korea

What About the Swiss?

Group E with Brazil, Serbia & Costa Rica

Matchday 1 – Sunday, June 17, 2018 at 11 am – Brazil

Matchday 2 – Friday, June 22, 2018 at 11 am – Serbia

Matchday 3 – Wednesday, June 27, 2018 at 11 am – Costa Rica

Other Places Around Vancouver

The American, 926 Main Street (Fr+Sa from 8 am, So-Th from 10 am)
Phat Sports Lounge Yaletown, 1055 Mainland Street (starting 8 am)
 secondflooreaterybar 808 Bute Street (1st/2nd game, maybe 3rd)
Cinema Public House, 901 Granville Street (1st, otherwise from 11 am)
Colony Bar, 3255 W Broadway (from 11 am, knockout round from 7 am)
Kamei Baru, 990 Smithe Street (from 11 am)
 The Charles Bar, 136 W Cordova Street (from 11 am)
 One Under, 476 Granville Street (from 11 am)
BC Kitchen, 39 Smithe Street (from 11 am, earlier if there’s an audience)
 Shark Club, 180 W Georgia Street (from 11 am)
 Timber – 1300 Robson Street, Vancouver

The Blenheim Pub + German flag

Soccer + Alpen Club

Vancouver Alpen Club

Manchester Pub

The Manchester Pub

The Pint downtown

The Pint

Order your print copy today!

Das Schwarze Brett - #7

By Elke Porter in Das Schwarze Brett

24 pages, published 5/31/2018

Das Schwarze Brett contains articles like the Midsummer Night’s Dream, Josias Tschanz, the German Canadian Business Association, the Surrey German School, the Vancouver Westside German School, new manage of the Alpen Club

We are also excited to introduce our advertisers, who will now have their ads posted on the advertising page of Westcoast German News.

Several months ago, Eric Spoeth from Edmonton contacted me to let me know that he had written and filmed a movie and would be showing it in Vancouver on April 8th, 2018. I agreed to promote the film in my “Das Schwarze Brett” magazine and on this blog. We even traded ad space. He received a half-page ad and I was able to see my 30-second advertising spot on the big screen.

Here is a picture of film director Erich Spoeth, with one of the “stars” of the show. His mother, Erika, was the youngest of 4 children, born towards the end of the war. She had two older sisters (Alwine & Altertine aka Tina) and one brother (Wiegand). This movie was the story of them being forced to flee the USSR in 1944 and end up staying in a house in a small village along the way. That is the last time the children saw their father alive. Baby Erika was only 1 year old.

Here are two of the young people waiting out front in the line up and the three teenagers sitting together in the theatre.  One of these girls was born in Germany, one was born in Vancouver to a German father and one was born to a German mother. Each of them had a reason to attend this film.  To learn about their heritage.  To learn historical facts from a German-citizen-born-outside Germany perspective (Volksdeutsche) and to be a part of the German Community here in Vancouver.

After the event in the lobby

Here is one of the young ladies raising her hand to ask a question in the Q & A season after the film was over.  The questions were typical ones you might expect:  How did you end up in Canada?  What made you decide to make the film? Where was the story filmed?

The main thing when talking it over with some of the youngest audience members was hearing how this story was all new to them. Only one out of 3 had heard a little bit about this turbulent time in history, when Germans living in the USSR and other territories were caught up in the violence of war and forced to leave their homes, sometimes in the dead of winter, forever.

The girl who knew about Russian Germans had an  Oma (grandmother) who came from Bessarabia, a place where Germans had been invited to live by Katarina the Great and had built prosperous farms and villages over 150 years. World War II changed everything. First, they had been forced to leave their homes in 1941, and had been relocated to West Prussia.  Then, they had been overrun by Soviets and again, where forced to leave a place they had just gotten used to. But at least, the Bessarabians had been relocated as one group and had even arranged to stay in the same relocation camps as one united group during the war.

Unlike having woman and children, as well as entire families, separated as men were either fighting in the war, working for the war effort or supporting their families with long-distance work.  The women, the children, the elderly were the ones who made the escapes in the big so-called “Trek”.  That is what happened to the Zernickel family.  Just as the father left, the mother and her four young children were forced to leave.  Helene tried everything she could to stall, to wait, so that Waldemar could catch up with her, but alas.

Waiting for Waldemar never does come up with an answer to the question:  Where is Waldemar?   Instead, he has been missing since 1944. Nobody ever found out where he went or what happened to him.  There is nothing they would like better than to see him one more time.  Talk to him one more time.  Spend some time with him, listening to his music, his piano, his singing…  If Waldemar Zernickel was alive today, he would be 105 years old, but that wouldn’t matter. The movie did its part by pulling in the audience and letting us feel the anguish, the loss, the pain, as well as the hope and belief that kept them going.

I can recommend everyone to watch this movie and be transformed by the story.  As ordinary Germans who just wanted to be together, to enjoy family life, to play piano, and eat farm fresh food and who were caught up in events beyond their control.  Yet they still came out of it with the knowledge that “Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.”

Waiting for Waldemar is a moving 45-minute film about a family that escaped to Germany from Russia during the Second World War. Erika and her brother Wiegand, who were only babies when their father Waldemar disappeared during the escape and are now in their 70’s, combine fragments of memories and third-hand testimonies to paint a picture of the man that meant – and means – so much to them. Waiting for Waldemar is a bittersweet affirmation that love bears all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Eric Spoeth has directed two full length documentaries and a dozen short films. His work includes working as an Assistant Director on The Matrix, Cut Bank, Blackstone, and other film and TV productions across Alberta.

You can buy the movie on the website:  http://www.spoeth.com/wfw.html

10 Apr 2018
April 10, 2018

Canada’s Concentration Camps

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You might be wondering if I am referring to residential schools.  But no, I am talking about the internment camps in World War I and II – right on Canadian Soil.  For Germans. Japanese. Ukranians. Austrians, Hungarians. For anyone they considered “enemy aliens.” They are listed here:

Amherst, Nova Scotia Malleable Iron Foundry April 1915 to September 1919
Beauport, Quebec The Armoury December 1914 to June 1916
Banff-Castle Mountain, Alberta Dominion Park July 1915 to July 1917
Brandon, Manitoba Exhibition Building September 1914 to July 1916
Edgewood, British Columbia Bunk Houses August 1915 to September 1916
Fernie-Morrissey, British Columbia Rented premises June 1915 to October 1918
Halifax, Nova Scotia The Citadel September 1914 to October 1918
Jasper, Alberta Dominion Park February 1916 to August 1916
Kapuskasing, Ontario Bunk Houses December 1914 to February 1920
Kingston, Ontario Fort Henry August 1914 to November 1917
Lethbridge, Alberta Exhibition Building September 1914 to November 1916
Monashee-Mara Lake, British Columbia Tents and Bunkhouses June 1915 to July 1917
Montreal, Quebec Immigration Hall August 1914 to November 1918
Munson-Eaton, Alberta Railway Cars October 1918 to March 1919
Nanaimo, British Columbia Provincial government building September 1914 to September 1915
Niagara Falls, Ontario The Armoury December 1914 to August 1918
Petawawa, Ontario Militia Camp December 1914 to May 1916
Revelstoke-Field-Otter, British Columbia Bunk Houses September 1915 to October 1916
Sault-St-Marie, Ontario The Armoury January 1915 to January 1918
Spirit Lake, Quebec Bunk Houses January 1915 to January 1917
Toronto, Ontario Stanley Barracks December 1914 to October 1916
Winnipeg, Manitoba Fort Osborne September 1914 to July 1916
Valcartier, Quebec Militia Camp April 1915 to October 1915
Vernon, British Columbia Provincial government building September 1914 to February 1920

World War II Info

German Canadian internment[edit]

During the Second World War, 850 German Canadians were accused of being spies for the Nazis, as well as subversives and saboteurs. The internees were given a chance by authorities to defend themselves; according to the transcripts of the appeal tribunals, internees and state officials debated conflicting concepts of citizenship.

Many German Canadians interned in Camp Petawawa were from a nineteenth-century migration in 1876. They had arrived in a small area a year after a Polish migration landed in Wilno, Ontario. Their hamlet, made up of farmers primarily, was called Germanicus, and is in the bush less than 10 miles from Eganville, Ontario. Their farms (homesteads originally) were expropriated by the federal government for no compensation, and the men were imprisoned behind barbed wire in the AOAT camp. (The Foymount Air Force Base near Cormac and Eganville was built on this expropriated land.) Notable was that not one of these homesteaders from 1876 or their descendants had ever visited Germany again after 1876, yet they were accused of being German Nazi agents.

756 German sailors, mostly captured in East Asia were sent from camps in India to Canada in June 1941 (Camp 33).

World War I Info

In World War I, 8,579 male “aliens of enemy nationality” were interned, including 5,954 Austro-Hungarians, including ethnic Ukrainians, and Croatians. Many of these internees were used for forced labour in internment camps.

The Ukrainian Canadian internment was part of the confinement of “enemy aliens” in Canada during and for two years after the end of the First World War, lasting from 1914 to 1920, under the terms of the War Measures Act that would be used again, in the Second World War, against Japanese Canadians.

About 4,000 Ukrainian men and some women and children of Austro-Hungarian citizenship were kept in twenty-four internment camps and related work sites — also known, at the time, as concentration camps.

Many were released in 1916 to help with the mounting labour shortage. Another 80,000 were registered as “enemy aliens” and obliged to regularly report to the police. Those interned had whatever little wealth they owned confiscated and were forced to work for the profit of their gaolers.Internment[edit]

Most of those interned were young men apprehended while trying to cross the border into the U.S. to look for jobs; attempting to leave Canada was illegal.During the First World War, a growing sentiment against “enemy aliens” had manifested itself amongst Canadians. The British government urged Canada not to act indiscriminately against subject nationalities of the Austro-Hungarian Empire who were in fact friendly to the British Empire.

However, Ottawa took a hard line. These enemy-born citizens were treated as social pariahs, and many lost their employment. Under the 1914 War Measures Act, “aliens of enemy nationality” were compelled to register with authorities. About 70,000 Ukrainians from Austria-Hungary fell under this description. 8,579 males and some women and children were interned by the Canadian Government, including 5,954 Austro-Hungarians, most of whom were probably ethnic Ukrainians.[4] Most of the interned were poor or unemployed single men, although 81 women and 156 children (mainly Germans in Vernon and Ukrainians at Spirit Lake) had no choice but to accompany their menfolk to two of the camps, in Spirit Lake, near Amos, Quebec, and Vernon, British Columbia. Some of the internees were Canadian-born and others were naturalized British subjects,[citation needed] although most were recent immigrants. Citizens of the Russian Empire were generally not interned.

Commemorative statue and damaged plaque at the “Ukrainian cemetery” of the Kapuskasing Internment Camp; Kapuskasing, northern Ontario

Commemorative stone at the Saskatchewan Railway Museum, formerly “Eaton Siding” near the Eaton Internment Camp, one of twenty-four, where 8,579 civilians were interned. It reads “Fortitude. To the memory of those who were interned at this site during the Great War. Eaton Internment Camp 1919.”

Many of these internees were used for forced labour in internment camps.[5] Conditions at the camps varied, and the Castle Mountain Internment Camp where labour contributed to the creation of Banff National Park[7] — was considered exceptionally harsh and abusive.[8] The internment continued for two more years after the war had ended, although most Ukrainians were paroled into jobs for private companies by 1917. Even as parolees, they were still required to report regularly to the police authorities. Federal and provincial governments and private concerns benefited from the internees’ labour and from the confiscation of what little wealth they had, a portion of which was left in the Bank of Canada at the end of the internment operations on June 20, 1920.[9] A small number of internees, including men considered to be “dangerous foreigners”, labour radicals, or particularly troublesome internees, were deported to Europe after the war, largely from the Kapuskasing camp, which was the last to be shut down.

Of those interned, 109 died of various diseases and injuries sustained in the camp, six were killed while trying to escape, and some — according to Sir William Dillon Otter’s final report — went insane or committed suicide[10] as a result of their confinement.

 

© Courtesy of the collection of Derek Cash

Right here in BC

Recently received this comment:

I saw your recent post at Westcoast German News concerning concentration
camps in Canada during the Great War. You may be interested to know that
members of the Vernon and District Family History Society have been
researching the camps in this area. I’ve attached a flyer about a
28-page booklet recently published as a kind of “interim report” on our
findings. (I think people have been surprised at how much the story
concerns Germans, rather than Ukrainians.)

Vernon & District Family History Society (http://www.vdfhs.com/) is a non-profit genealogical association. It first secured a grant from the Canadian World War I Internment Recognition Fund to restore headstones of the (11) prisoners who died in the Vernon Internment Camp, and to research their histories. Then it received a second grant to research in detail the Vernon camp as well as three others in this vicinity: Monashee, Edgewood, and Mara Lake.

A committee has been working for three years on the project, and has amassed a significant amount of new information from foreign archives, private collections, and newspapers with which to supplement surviving records in the national archives.

Vernon Internment Camps

© Courtesy of the collection of Derek Cash

The great thing about the research is the detail we have been able to bring to stories of several prisoners, and to some of the guards as well. The Vernon camp generally held 250-350 people, most of them single German men, and a couple of dozen families and children. They were very diverse in their education, background, and politics, but despite that managed to create a remarkable “community” for a time. Most were deported in the course of 1919. We have managed to identify some of their ancestors and gain access to some remarkable collections of letters and photos, small and large. The booklet features several of these.

No buildings remain in any of the camp locations. Most shelters were woodframe or tents, and are long gone. A “brick building” acted as the administration office at Vernon Internment Camp, but was demolished in the 1940s. (The 10-acre site is now a public school and sports ground.) The Canadian World War I Internment Recognition Fund has funded memorial plaques for all these locations.

Vernon Internment Camp Book

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